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Conditional sentences

  • Type 1 conditionals, basic uses: If the weather clears, we'll go for a walk.
  • If + present + modal: 'If it's fine tomorrow, we may go for a swim.'
  • If + should, instead of if + present : If I should see him, I'll ask him to ring you.
  • Imperative + 'and/or' + clause: 'Fail to pay and ...'
    ~ Type 1 conditionals, basic uses:
    If the weather clears, we'll go for a walk.
    Study:

      1 We can use all present tenses after if, not just the simple present, for example:
      If she finishes work early, she will go home. (if + simple present + will)
      If she has finished work by 4 o'clock, she will go home. (if + present perfect + will)
      2 We can use all future tenses in the main clauses, not just the will-future:
      If he doesn't hurry, the plane will have left by the time he gets to the airport.
      3 We use Type 1 conditionals to describe what will or won't (probably) happen:
      If the weather clears, we'll go for a walk.
      (Not "If the weather will clear")
    Write:
      Supply the correct forms of the missing verbs.
      1 If it (be) fine tomorrow, we (go) for a picnic. see the answer
      2 If I (have) time tonight, I (finish) the novel I'm reading. see the answer
      3 If it (rain) next weekend, we (not able to) plant the vegetables. see the answer
      4 If he (be leaving) at 6 o'clock, I (ask) him to give me a lift. see the answer
      5 If she (have drive) all that way since this morning she (be) tired and hungry. see the answer
      6 If they (have/be working) all afternoon, they (probably need) a cup of tea. see the answer
      7 If I (can't/finish) the job this weekend, I (try) to get it done during the week. see the answer
      8 If John (be picked) for the team, he (be boasting) about it for weeks! see the answer
      9 If you (have/forget) to phone, they (will have/go) without you. see the answer
      10 If we (stay) in this flat till May, we (will have/be living) here for twenty years. see the answer

    ~ If + present + modal:
    'If it's fine tomorrow, we may go for a swim.'
    Study:
      When we use will in the main clause, we are expressing certainty or near-certainty:
      If the weather clears, we'll go for a walk. (certain, or nearly certain)
      If we do not feel 'certain' enough to use will, we can use another modal to say what is possible, necessary or desirable, for example:
      If it's fine tomorrow, we may go for a swim. (it's possible)
      If it's fine tomorrow, we must go for a swim. (it's necessary or desirable to do this)
    Write:
      Supply the correct forms of the missing verbs, but use these modals in the main clause: can, could, may, might, should, ought to, or must. Alternatives are possible.
      1 If you (be) still ill tomorrow, you stay at home. see the answer
      2 If you (finish) work early, you come for a drink with us. see the answer
      3 If she (have) too much to do, she ask someone to help her. see the answer
      4 If he (not be coming) tonight, he come next week. see the answer
      5 If he (have/only just arrive), he not have heard the news. see the answer
      6 If they (have be/waiting) longer than an hour, they be getting impatient. see the answer
      7 If we (can't/go) next week, we manage to go the week after. see the answer

    ~ 'If + 'should' instead of 'If + present'
    Study:
      If + should, instead of if+ present, makes the condition more doubtful or very polite:
      If I should see him, I'll ask him to ring you. (= If I see him, I'll ask him to ring you.)
    Write:
    ~ Imperative + 'and/or' + clause:
    'Fail to pay and ...'
    Study:
      We can use the imperative in place of an if-clause to comment, threaten, request, etc.

      1 We follow the imperative with and in place of an if-clause in the affirmative:
      If you fail to pay, they'll cut off the electricity.
      Fail to pay and they'll cut off the electricity.

      2 We follow the imperative with or in place of an if-clause in the negative:
      If you don't stop borrowing money, you'll be in trouble.
      Stop borrowing money, or you'll be in trouble.
    Write: